Пехота Российской Империи 1877-1917 (birserg_1977) wrote,
Пехота Российской Империи 1877-1917
birserg_1977

Анонс англоязычных изданий на декабрь.

9
How Japan's World War II race to build an atomic bomb fathered North Korea's nuclear threat. This revised and greatly updated third edition of Japan's Secret War is a groundbreaking, thoroughly sourced investigation into one of the least-known, yet highly significant episodes of World War II: Japan's frantic race to develop its own atomic bomb. We'll discover how that effort then evolved into North Korea's nuclear program and the looming threat it presents to mankind. Japan's WWII development of a nuclear program is not universally known. After decades of research into national intelligence archives both in the US and abroad, Robert Wilcox builds on his earlier accounts and provides the most detailed account available of the creation of Japan's version of our own Manhattan Project--from the project's inception before America's entry into WWII, to the possible detonation of a nuclear device in 1945 in present-day North Korea. Wilcox weaves a fascinating portrait of the secret giant industrial complex in northern Korea where Japan's atomic research and testing culminated. And it is there that North Korea, following the Japanese defeat, salvaged what remained of the complex and fashioned its own nuclear program. This program puts not only Japan, but also its allies, including the US, in jeopardy.

10
Ray Perry was a farm boy from rural West Texas when America entered World War II. He always had a fascination with planes, so he joined the U.S. Army Air Corps with the intention of becoming a pilot. The Army Air Corps needed tail gunners, however, so Ray served his country at the back end of a B-17, completing thirty-five combat missions before the war's end. This is the story of his World War II adventure, wrought with tragedy and excitement and every emotion in between. This is also the story of how a young man from a small West Texas town handled the upheaval that comes with war. Based off numerous primary source materials, Ray's story unfolds through his letters, photos, and mementos. The book's foreword is written by his son, and former Texas governor, Rick Perry.
"I never was rattled . . . . I could never remember really being scared. I know I was. Had to be. But I had control of it."
"The pilot sent the radio operator back there to see if they got me . . . and he climbed, crawled, right there beside the side of that tail wheel, and he never did get back all the way where I was at, but he . . . saw me sitting up and he saw me move a little. So, he went back and told the pilot, "I guess he's alright. I think he's still alive." - Ray Perry, from the book
14
So much has been written about the Battle of Stalingrad - the Soviet victory that turned the tide of the Second World War - that we should know everything about it. But the history of the war, and the battle, is evolving and is being written anew, and Alexey Isaev's engrossing account is a striking example of this fresh approach.
By bringing together previously unpublished Russian archive material - strategic directives and orders, after-action reports and official records of all kinds - with the vivid recollections of soldiers who were there, in the front lines, he reconstructs what happened in extraordinary detail. The evidence leads him to question common assumptions about the conduct of the battle - about the use of tanks and mechanized forces, for instance, and the combat capability, and tenacity, of the defeated and surrounded German Sixth Army in the last weeks before it surrendered.
His gripping narrative carries the reader through the course of the entire battle from the first small-scale encounters on the approaches to Stalingrad in July 1942, through the intense continuous fighting through the city, to the encirclement, the beating back of the relieving force and the capitulation of the Sixth Army in February 1943.
Alexey Isaev's latest book is an important contribution to the literature on this decisive battle. It offers a thought-provoking revised view of events for readers who are already familiar with the story, and it is a fascinating introduction for those who are coming to it for the first time.
2
Between 1961 and 1974 Portugal fought a war to retain its African colonies of Angola, Guinea-Bissau, and Mozambique. Collectively known as the Campaigns for Africa, the origin of the conflict stems from the post-World War II atmosphere of nationalism and anti-colonial fervour. The Angolan insurgency began in 1961, followed by unrest in Guinea-Bissau in 1963 and Mozambique in 1964.
Portugal's initial actions in Angola were based on foot-slogging by infantry, considered the best method of addressing an insurgency, not only to hunt the enemy but also to keep contact with the population. But in the vast areas of Angola - the majority of which was unsuited to wheeled vehicles - this tactical approach was too painful, and for Portugal the number of troops available was limited. The helicopter was a possible solution, but it was beyond Portugal's finance resources and it had a tendency to fly over those areas where it was vital to communicate with the population and secure its loyalty.
When in 1966 the enemy guerrillas sought a new front in eastern Angola, Portugal needed a force that could combine mobility over rough terrain with the ability to engage insurgents, while maintaining strong links with the population.
One of the adaptive solutions to this challenge was found in the past: create horse cavalry units in the form of dragoons that were equally trained for cavalry or infantry service, just as their historical predecessors fought. In this particular case, adaptive tactics involved adjusting existing military methods and means from the traditional and available inventory to craft a solution that would deny eastern Angola to insurgents and support the population there. This story is about imaginative thinking that, instead of a 'forced abandonment of the old', led to a 'resurrection of the old'.
8
Revered by some as the ultimate warrior, and condemned by others as ruthless assassins, the combat sniper is more than just a crack shot. These are highly disciplined individuals, calm professionals skilled in marksmanship, reconnaissance and camouflage. During the Second World War these lethal fighters were deployed by all sides to deadly effect.
This collection of biographies written by sniper experts from around the world explores the careers of the top marksmen between 1939 and 1945. As well as providing incisive technical information, each author offers a glimpse of the character and personality of their chosen sniper, giving them a human face that is often missing in standard portrayals.
These gripping, in-depth narratives go beyond the cursory treatment in existing histories and will be essential reading for anyone wanting to learn about the role and technique of the sniper during the Second World War.
The impressive list of contributors to The Sniper Anthology includes Mark Spicer writing on Harry M. Furness, the last surviving British sniper who went ashore on D-Day; Martin Pegler, who details the famous Soviet sniper Vassili Zaitsev; Adrian Gilbert on the Wehrmacht sharpshooter and lone wolf Sepp Allerberger; and Roger Moorhouse on Simo Hayha, the man with the most confirmed kills in any major war.
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