Пехота Российской Империи 1877-1917 (birserg_1977) wrote,
Пехота Российской Империи 1877-1917
birserg_1977

Анонс англоязычных изданий на июнь.

6
Panzers in Berlin 1945 is a study of German armor during the Battle of Berlin in April and May of 1945 and is the first book to examine the role of Panzers in this final battle.This 392-page book is lavishly illustrated with 360 mostly unpublished photographs that take the reader from the retreat at Seelow to collecting wrecks from central Berlin. Years of painstaking research and a network of like-minded researchers from across the globe have enabled the authors to piece together the who, where, and why, including lists of wrecks documented by the military government in the immediate post-war period.In addition to informative text and hundreds of photos, many pages include a QR code - just point your smartphone camera at the code to show the scene today in Google Street View, while a separate map shows Berlin as it was in 1945 and plots the locations of the wrecks.To complete the coverage, acclaimed military artist Felipe Rodna has created sixteen pages of exquisite specially-commissioned artwork.

7
Early in the morning of 2 August 1990, aircraft of the Iraqi Air Force bombed Kuwaiti air bases, and then the Iraqi Republican Guards stormed into the country. Thus began what would be called the `Gulf War' - also the `II Gulf War', and sometimes the `II Persian Gulf War' - fought between January and March 1991.
Although encountering some problems, the Iraqi forces occupied Kuwait in a matter of few days. However, when President Saddam Hussein of Iraq unleashed his military upon Kuwait, little did he know what kind of reaction he would provoke from the Western superpowers, and what kind of devastation his country would suffer in return.
Concerned about the possibility of Iraq continuing its advance into Saudi Arabia, the USA - in coordination with Great Britain, France, and several local allies - reacted by deploying large contingents of their air-, land- and naval forces to the Middle East.
Months of fruitless negotiations and the continuous military build-up - Operation Desert Shield - followed, as tensions continued to increase. Determined to retain Kuwait, and despite multiple warnings from his own generals, Saddam Hussein rejected all demands to withdraw. The USA and its allies, `the Coalition', were as determined to drive out the invader and restore Kuwaiti independence. Gradually, they agreed this would have to be by force.
Following an authorisation from the United Nations, the Coalition launched the Operation Desert Storm, on 17 January 1991, opening one of the most intensive air campaigns in history. The last conventional war of the 20th Century saw the large, but essentially traditional, Iraqi Army overwhelmed by forces trained and equipped to exploit the latest technologies.
Desert Storm reveals the whole war fought between Iraq and an international coalition, from the start of this campaign to its very end. Largely based on data released from official archives, spiced with numerous interviews, and illustrated with over 100 photographs, 18 colour profiles and maps, it offers a refreshing insight into this unique conflict.
8
This text provides an innovative global military history that joins three periods-World War I, the interwar years, and World War II. Jeremy Black offers a comprehensive survey of both wars, comparing continuities and differences. He traces the causes of each war and assesses land, sea, and air warfare as separate dimensions. He argues that the unprecedented nature of the two wars owed much to the demographic and industrial strength of the states involved and their ability and determination to mobilize vast resources. Yet the demands of the world wars also posed major difficulties, not simply in sustaining the struggle but also in conceiving of practical strategies and operational methods in the heat and competition of ever-evolving conflict. In this process, resources, skills, leadership, morale, and alliance cohesion all proved significant.
In addition to his military focus, Black considers other key dimensions of the conflicts, especially political and social influences and impacts. He thoroughly integrates the interwar years, tracing the significant continuities between the two world wars. He emphasizes how essential American financial, industrial, agricultural, and energy resources were to the Allies-both before and after the United States entered each war. Bringing the two world wars to life, Black sheds light not only on both as individual conflicts but also on the interwoven relationships between the two.
9
Al Venter's latest book on South Africa's 23-year Border War along the Angolan frontier offers a host of new perspectives. These include details about units like the South African Air Force 44 Squadron which converted Dakota aircraft into flying gun platforms similar to those used in America's war in South-East Asia. He also has American nuclear specialist David Albright - one of the leading authorities on nuclear proliferation - take a long hard look at Pretoria's atom bomb program. Elsewhere he deals with the medium-range intercontinental ballistic missile programme that was developed (with Israeli help) in conjunction with building the bomb.
Most salient, Venter takes a fresh look at the enemies that were ranged against the SADF, and in particular how SWAPO guerrillas fared. They were obviously a gutsy, well-trained and well-motivated guerrilla force to have survived almost a quarter century of hostilities: indeed, as an insurgent force they were streets ahead of other guerrilla groups such as those who fought the Portuguese and the Rhodesians. Combat-wise, South Africa's ANC military wing does not even begin to compare.
There is also, within more than 20 chapters - written either by the author or by specialist friends - a fascinating chapter on covert communications during the war which stretched almost all the way across Africa and into the Indian Ocean. Another chapter looks at what gave the six-wheeled 'thin-skinned' Ratel Infantry Combat Vehicle the ability to tackle Soviet main battle tanks in combat during the course of several Angolan conventional bush war battles and thrash them, a world first that remains unbeaten.
10
This powerful collection, depicting the advent of the tank and the lead up to the battle for Cambrai, showcases the work of the contemporary combat artists and illustrators from the Great War era. Included here are the works of serious artists, propagandists, illustrators and humourists. The result is a stunning and vivid graphic record of life and death in the first battles of armoured warfare, as reported to contemporary audiences at a time when the events of the Great War were still unfolding. During the Great War artists and illustrators produced a highly accurate visual record of the fleeting moments the bulky cameras couldn't reproduce. These works form a body of war reportage that are as valid as the written word. Today, the work of the combat illustrators and the official war artists from the Great War era is overlooked by historians in favour of photographs, but these illustrations are nonetheless important, as they provide a contemporary record of hand-to-hand fighting, trench raids, aerial dogfights, sea battles, desperate last stands, night actions and cavalry charges.
11
The majority of narratives about the October 1973 Arab-Israeli War stress that air power did not play a dominant role. The deployment of strong, well-integrated air defences by Egypt and Syria, that caused heavy losses to the Israeli air force early during that conflict, not only spoiled Israel's pre-war planning, but prevented it from providing support for Israeli ground forces too.
A cross-examination of interviews with dozens of Egyptian participants in that conflict, contemporary reporting in the media, and also intelligence reports, offers an entirely different picture. Accordingly, for much of that war, the Israelis flew heavy air strikes on Port Said, on the northern entry to the Suez Canal. Furthermore, they repeatedly attacked two major Egyptian air bases in the Nile Delta - el-Mansourah and Tanta - in turn causing some of the biggest air battles of this war. Indeed, in Egypt, the response to these attacks reached the level of legend: the supposed repelling of an Israeli air strike on el-Mansourah, on 14 October 1973, prompted Cairo to declare not only a massive victory, but also that date for the day of its air force.
However, the actual reasons for Israeli air strikes on Port Said, el-Mansourah and Tanta remain unclear to this day: there are no Israeli publications offering a sensible explanation, and there are no Egyptian publications explaining the reasoning. Only a cross-examination of additional reporting provides a possible solution: el-Mansourah was also the base of the only Egyptian unit equipped with R-17E ballistic missiles, known as the SS-1 Scud in the West.
As of October 1973, these missiles were the only weapon in Egyptian hands capable of reaching central Israel - and that only if fired from the area around Port Said. While apparently unimportant in the overall context, this fact gains immensely in importance considering reports from the US intelligence services about the possible deployment of Soviet nuclear warheads to Egypt in October 1973.
Discussing all the available information, strategy, tactics, equipment and related combat operations of both sides, `1973: the First Nuclear War' provides an in-depth insight into the Israeli efforts to prevent the deployment of Egyptian Scud missiles - whether armed with Soviet nuclear warheads or not - in the Port Said area: an effort that dictated a lengthy segment of the application of air power during the October 1973 Arab-Israeli war, and resulted in some of the most spectacular air-to-air and air-to-ground battles of that conflict.
Illustrated by over 100 photographs, a dozen maps and 18 colour profiles, this book thus offers an entirely new thesis about crucial, but previously unknown factors that determined the flow of the aerial warfare in October 1973.
12
`You have to die in Piedmont!' An old folk song, still played in the western Alps, speaks about the French regiments that were incoming from the Mongeneve Pass in order to attack a combined Austro-Sardinian force entrenched on the Assietta Plateau at 2,500 meters (about 8,200 ft) of elevation in the Cottian Alps, which controls two main roads from France to the Kingdom of Sardinia's capital, Turin. The battle occurred 19 June 1747, and was the bloodiest single day battle not only of the War of Austrian Succession (1740-1748) in Italy, but also of the whole military history of the Alps, and of mountain warfare in general.
The strategic goal of the French offensive was the siege and the capture of the Fort of Exilles, a fortress in the Susa Valley on the road from Briancon to Turin. An army of about 20,000 soldiers under the command of Louis Charles Armand Fouquet de Belle-Isle (called the Chevalier de Belle-Isle, the younger brother of the Marshal de Belle-Isle) was divided into two corps: one went down the Moncenisio towards Exilles, while the other advanced towards the Chisone Valley, in order to reach the Assietta ridge from the south side. Having predicted that the French would move through it, the King Charles Emmanuel III of Savoy had fortified the area with an entrenched camp garrisoned with 7,000 men of 13 infantry battalions: 9 Sardinian, and 4 Austrian.
French intelligence discovered that the allied forces were fortifying the pass, while the main Austrian army had left the siege of Genoa to reach the Alps. So, the decision was taken to attack immediately. The forces involved amounted to 32 French battalions against 13 allied. The French troops were divided into three attacking columns and their movements began at about 16:30 pm. Despite the desperate effort of the soldiers and the personal value of the French officers, all the attacks were repulsed with heavy losses. In a matter of three hours of murderous firefight, five thousand soldiers, out of 27,000 men engaged, were killed, wounded or missing: even the French commander, the Chevalier de Belle-Isle, was killed in the struggle.
Since that day, the Battle of Assietta became a sort of military legend for the Sardinian forces, and subsequently for the Italian Army, but no serious attempt to reconstruct the event was ever made. Only the French at the end of the 19th century tried to develop a more detailed study of the struggle by publishing the manuscript written by the Lieutenant-General de Vault in the second half of 18th century. This is therefore the first full work to address the history of this battle.
13
This powerful collection, depicting cavalry engagements on all fronts, showcases the work of contemporary combat artists and illustrators from the Great War era. Included here are the works of serious artists, propagandists, illustrators and humourists. The result is a stunning graphic record of the horse in action during the Great War, as reported to contemporary audiences at a time when the events of the Great War were still unfolding. During the Great War artists and illustrators produced a highly accurate visual record of the fleeting moments the bulky cameras couldn't reproduce. These works form a body of war reportage that are as valid as the written word. Today, the work of the combat illustrators and the official war artists from the Great War era is overlooked by historians in favour of photographs, but these illustrations are nonetheless important, as their work provides a contemporary record of hand-to-hand fighting, trench raids, aerial dogfights, sea battles, desperate last stands, night actions and cavalry charges.
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