Пехота Российской Империи 1877-1917 (birserg_1977) wrote,
Пехота Российской Империи 1877-1917
birserg_1977

Анонс англоязычных изданий на конец февраля.

1
The young men who flew and fought during the First World War had no idea what was awaiting them. The rise of science and nationalism during the late 19th and early 20th centuries came to a head in 1914\. The 'technology shock' that coalesced at the Western Front was not envisaged by any of the leadership. These men did the best they could and gave their full measure but it wasn't enough. Each suffered from their experiences, some better than others. Each knew it was a defining moment in their lives never to be repeated. And many felt that the dynamic context of aerial combat was something that, after the war, they still longed for, despite the attendant horrors.
The medical and psychiatric profession evolved symbiotically with the war. Like the patients they were charged with treating, doctors were unprepared for what awaited them. Doctors argued over best practice for treatment. Of course, the military wanted these men to return to duty as quickly as possible; with mounting casualties, each country needed every man. Aviation psychiatry arose as a new subset of the field, attempting to treat psychological symptoms previously unseen in combatants. The unique conditions of combat flying produced a whole new type of neurosis.
Terms such as Aero-neurosis were coined to provide the necessary label yet, like shell shock, they were inadequate when it came to describing the full and complete shock to the psyche.
We are fortunate that many of these fliers chose to write. They kept diaries and letters about their experiences after the war and they are, of course, an invaluable record. But perhaps more importantly, they were also a means for many of them to heal.
Mark C. Wilkins finds the psychology undergirding historical events fascinating and of chief interest to him as an historian. He has included expert medical testimony and excerpts where relevant in a fascinating book that explores the legacies of aerial combat, illustrating the ways in which pilots had to amalgamate their suffering and experiences into their post-war lives. Their attempts to do so can perhaps be seen as an extension of their heroism.

2
Cruisers were the Navy's maids-of-all-work, employed in a greater variety of roles than any other warship type. Smaller, faster and far more numerous than battleships, they could be risked in situations where capital ships were too vulnerable, while still providing heavy gunfire support for smaller ships or anti-aircraft cover for the fleet. As such, they were in the frontline of the naval war from the outset - and from its first days, the fighting provided unexpected challenges and some very unpleasant surprises, not least the efficacy of air power.
Cruisers learned to deal with these new realities in the Norway campaign and later in the Mediterranean, partly through the introduction of new technology - notably radar - but also by codifying the hard-won experience of those involved. This highly original book analyses the first years of the war when the sharpest lessons were learned, initially describing every action and its results, and then summarising in individual chapters the conclusions that could be drawn for the many aspects of a cruiser's duties. These include the main roles like surface gunnery, shore bombardment, anti-aircraft tactics and fighter direction, but also encompass technology like radar, asdic and shipborne aircraft, and even tackle more human issues such as shipboard organisation, damage control, the impact of weather and the morale factor. It also attempts to evaluate the importance of electronic warfare, intelligence and code-breaking, and concludes with a comparison between the performance of British cruisers and their Italian and German opponents.
Thought-provoking and sometimes controversial, this is a book that should be read by everyone interested in the Second World War at sea.
3
En 1984, les Editions Heimdal publiaient leur tout premier historique divisionnaire : 9.SS-Panzer-Division. Ecrit par feu Herbert Furbringer, un ancien de la Hohenstaufen, cet ouvrage a fait date. Aujourd'hui, les deux meilleurs specialistes francais sur la Waffen SS s'associent pour le doter d'un complement indispensable. Environ 800 photos, en grande partie inedites, pres de 200 documents, de nombreux temoignages ainsi que les biographies des principaux officiers de la division.
4
This is the History of the Lancashire Fusiliers founded in the year of William III's Glorious Revolution up until 1821
5
The Regiment saw service in the Caribbean and also to defend the Rock of Gibralter. The regiment fought at all the major battles of the Crimean War
6
11th November 1918 saw the signing of the armistice that ended fighting between the Allies and Germany.
This book will take the reader through the final year of the First World War and everything that led up to this day. Starting from the Spring Offensive, photos and images from The National Archives will highlight important points ranging from the last 100 days to the signing of the various treaties before this final armistice, finishing with a look at the Peace Parade in 1919\. The physical and mental effects of the war will also be examined, and show how the war never really ended in 1918 for many.
Many rarely seen images will be provided to support the narrative and further highlight the depth of The National Archives' First World War records.
7
This is the first full-length detailed study of the uniforms, organization, personnel and campaigns of the numerous Swiss units that served in the armies of Revolutionary, Directorate, and Imperial France from the campaigns of 1798 in Switzerland until the Hundred Days of 1815.
The author covers not just the regulation uniforms but also the numerous variations recorded in contemporary documents and plates. The uniforms of the Tete de Colonne could change from issue to issue and year to year and the author has tried to cover all of these known changes.
Estimates of the number of Swiss who served in the French Army from 1798-1815 vary from fifty to ninety thousand - numbers that makes the Swiss the largest non-French nationality in the Imperial Armies. There have been many studies of these units published in France and Switzerland but this is the first full-length study to be published in England
Tags: Анонсы, Книги
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